Please...Put a Cork In It....


I’m sure this will raise the hackles of a few, and maybe more. But this has always been one of my pet peeves when it comes to being financially taken for a ride by a restaurant. Many feel that there is some cardinal rule when it comes to bringing a wine you enjoy to a restaurant that provides that option, and in-turn charges you for that opportunity. I’ve express these same peeves many times in many places on the internet. The corkage charge is profit, nothing more and nothing less, and a good one at that. The glasses are washed with everybody else’s, so that’s not a good reason for extremely high corkage fees. When some people see a stratospherically priced bottle of wine, and they pass because of the price, that's lost profit to the restaurant. If the same person came back in with his own bottle and paid the corkage, or purchased a reasonably priced bottle, that’s pure profit. I'm not worried about a restaurant "trying" to fleece me or anybody else, as some of them are accomplishing that quite well when it comes to corkage and wine mark-ups. If a restaurant doesn't want my business, or doesn't want me to enjoy my favorite wine with my meal, that’s fine. If not, maybe a new rule of NO outside wine should be in order. Then I wouldn't give them my business if their wine was over priced. Many restaurants may have a decent wine list, that's true. But, if that decent wine list has indecent prices, it's the consumers place to make the decision to buy off the list or BYOB and pay the restaurants own established corkage charge. But it is NOT the consumers fault for that policy or pricing, and it's NOT the consumer’s obligation to assure the restaurants profitability. If an individual wants to bring a bottle of Two Buck Chuck, and pay a $20 corkage, that’s their decision to make, however foolish it may sound. But don’t blame the consumer for abiding by the restaurants own policy, or breaking some unwritten “cardinal rule” by not bringing in some $200 bottle of wine, or a bottle that’s on the wine list. Why would anyone want to pay $115 for a bottle of Silver Oak off the wine list, when they can bring in the same $60 bottle, pay the $20 corkage and save a few bucks, $35 to be exact! If a restaurant feels that I'm breaking some "cardinal rule" or something by bringing in MY selected wine, then the restaurant needs to change THEIR wine service policy. They need to state their policy...no outside wine, no wines that are on their wine list or no corkage and such. First, there's the restaurant owner’s right to establish their own wine service policy. Second, there's the right of the consumer to visit that restaurant while abiding by the established policy without feeling like a slug for bringing in a wine that's on the wine list. If I pay the corkage for my own bottle of wine that’s on the wine list for twice the price, or more, then so be it. If there's some unwritten "cardinal rule" that a restaurant owner thinks is being broken, put it in writing.